NASA has issued a Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) to purchase specific data resulting from industry efforts to test and verify vehicle capabilities through demonstrations of small robotic landers. The purpose is to inform the development of future human and robotic lander vehicles.

The Innovative Lunar Demonstrations Data (ILDD) BAA will result in multiple small firm-fixed price indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contracts with a total value up to $30.1 million through 2012. Multiple awards are possible with a minimum government purchase of $10,000 for each selected contractor. A minimum order will be funded using FY10 dollars. Orders above the minimum would be competed among the successful offerors dependent on future budget availability. The deadline for submitting proposals is Sept. 8.

The ILDD BAA challenges industry to demonstrate Earth-to-lunar surface flight system capabilities and test technologies. Data provided to NASA should include information related to landing using a human mission profile; identification of hazards during landing; precision landing; and imagery and long-duration surface operations.

Through the BAA, NASA’s Lander Project Office at the Johnson Space Center in Houston will increase its knowledge and understanding of design, testing and flight. The input could expedite plans to build and test hardware for future human and robotic landers.

The BAA asks for information about the design and demonstration of an end-to-end lunar landing mission. This includes data associated with hardware design, development and testing; ground operations and integration; launch; trajectory correction maneuvers; lunar braking, burn and landing; and enhanced capabilities.

Awarded contracts will be managed by the Lunar Lander Project Office.

For information about the BAA, visit:

http://prod.nais.nasa.gov

or

http://www.fedbizopps.gov

For information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov

Posted by: Soderman/NLSI Staff
Source: NASA

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